GEOSPATIAL
Informal Livelihoods Survey along Commonwealth, Quezon City

TOOLKIT / TOOLS / GEOSPATIAL / Informal Livelihoods

This study discusses the characteristics, hazard experience, perception of safety, and adaptation strategies of a sample of the informal sector in Quezon City to shed light on the informal sector which is often invisible and vulnerable to climate and other hazards yet is a vital participant of the local and national economy.

This study discusses the characteristics, hazard experience, perception of safety, and adaptation strategies of a sample of the informal sector in Quezon City. This section shed light on the informal sector which is often invisible and vulnerable to climate and other hazards yet is a vital participant of the local and national economy. Existing bodies of literature have expounded on the purpose, history, cultural, social demographics, and economics of the informal sector. Here, we give emphasis on spatial analysis of informal economy to characterize the visible forms, patterns, and distributions, and invisible relations of informal livelihood units and relate these with their experiences and perception of hazards as well as adaptation strategies. We hypothesize that one of the major factors for their emergence and development is their spatial location, particularly their proximity to urban magnets and local clustering. Moreover, their location also determines their exposure and vulnerability to natural and man-made hazards and can also hold the key to the appropriate adaptation measures.

Geomatics for Environment and Development Laboratory

GED applies remote sensing and geographic information systems (RS-GIS) technologies to process social and environmental data in map form. This is in order to provide information and knowledge needed to study and analyze socio-environmental themes, dynamics and spatial patterns of disaster risk, resource utilization, and sustainability. Our outputs guide the use of ancillary tools, policies, and plans for climate change adaptation and mitigation as well as disaster risk reduction and management towards sustainable development of local communities in their wider context. Development theory engendered in GED is that sustainable development is best ladderized although cross-cutting, as follows:

1. Human and Resource Security (Water-Energy-Food Nexus, Human Settlements and Health based on Demand, Supply, Access, Utilization)
Inclusivity
2. Equity with (Smart) Growth
3. Climate Change Mitigation
4. Co-Beneficial Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (CCA-DRRM) towards more risk-sensitive Comprehensive Land Use Plans (CLUPs)
5. Resilience
6. Overall and Demonstrable SD Cross-Sectoral Integration

For more information on the GED Laboratory, please visit their page.

RESEARCH TEAM

DR. MAY CELINE THELMA VICENTE

MS. PATRICIA PARAISO

MS. FLORDELIZA DEL CASTILLO

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